“the guernsey literary and potato peel pie society” review

I am a sucker when it comes to books being written in an un-traditional way. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer & Anne Barrows is one of those books, and I have fallen in love with it. Fallen hard.

Once again I’m late to the game with this book. Released in 2008, it has been on my TBR list for quite some time. Now that I finally read/finished it, I want to do so again. And again. And again.

Here is the Goodreads description:

“ I wonder how the book got to Guernsey? Perhaps there is some sort of secret homing instinct in books that brings them to their perfect readers.” January 1946: London is emerging from the shadow of the Second World War, and writer Juliet Ashton is looking for her next book subject. Who could imagine that she would find it in a letter from a man she’s never met, a native of the island of Guernsey, who has come across her name written inside a book by Charles Lamb….

As Juliet and her new correspondent exchange letters, Juliet is drawn into the world of this man and his friends—and what a wonderfully eccentric world it is. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society—born as a spur-of-the-moment alibi when its members were discovered breaking curfew by the Germans occupying their island—boasts a charming, funny, deeply human cast of characters, from pig farmers to phrenologists, literature lovers all.

Juliet begins a remarkable correspondence with the society’s members, learning about their island, their taste in books, and the impact the recent German occupation has had on their lives. Captivated by their stories, she sets sail for Guernsey, and what she finds will change her forever.

Written with warmth and humor as a series of letters, this novel is a celebration of the written word in all its guises, and of finding connection in the most surprising ways.

Since it is presented in the form of letters, all the characters get to present their own voice, matched against Juliet’s descriptions and observations. Guernsey not only comes to life for the MC, but feels like home to any reader as the book progresses.

Not without twists, you find yourself expecting one outcome with Juliet’s life and meeting another that is even more befitting.

My friends, since this book is eight years old, I was tempted to not share a small review, but I couldn’t help myself. I honestly knew nothing of the occupation of the Channel Islands during WWII, and now all I want to do is study it more.

If you love Historical Fiction, and have not read this one yet, move it to the top of your TBR list. You won’t regret it.

 

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